Southwest Nature Preserve – 10 September 17

Brief field notes from a walk from about 3:30-4:30pm, to the north pond and then over to the fishing pond. Weather Underground said the Fort Worth temperature was 84F with 35% humidity and barometer at 30.12 and falling. My thermometer said 86F in the shade; it was sunny and felt quite warm.

At the pond there were, of course, several turtles in the water and many dragonflies (such as pondhawks and whitetails). An adult leopard frog jumped into the path and then on into the pond. Late summer blooms attracted bees and a painted lady butterfly.

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One of the turtles, most likely red-eared slider

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Leopard frog

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Painted lady butterfly

At the other pond, the Maximillian’s sunflowers have grown wild and tall, and the flowers are always beautiful. I never get tired of them.IMG_1286

 

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About Michael Smith

From the age of 11 (in 1962), I grew up mostly in north Texas. I’ve been interested in herpetology for all those years, and so I have some experience with the reptiles and amphibians of Texas. I have written on the topic, given talks, been president of and editor for the DFW Herpetological Society. I wrote an article on venomous snakes published in Texas Parks & Wildlife Magazine. Clint King and I have a manuscript in the editorial process at Texas A&M University Press, anticipated out some time next year. Additionally, I have been licensed in Texas as a Psychological Associate since 1985 and have worked largely with children and families. My background and training are in the areas of applied behavior analysis and infant mental health, and I worked in an early childhood intervention program for many years. In that position, I worked with the child and family together, addressing a wide variety of issues including maltreatment and trauma as well as developmental disabilities such as autism. In recent years I have worked in a pediatric hospital, administering neuropsychological tests.
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